Life goes on – although on a drip

A big word of thanks must go out to all the residents from Boschenmeer Estate who volunteered to help with the adopt a green/fairway campaign. Unfortunately, we could not officially do that during lockdown, seeing that we only have a limited amount of emergency maintenance permits available for the course. We will relook this campaign once we go back to normal.

The normal emergency maintenance with volunteers (each with their own emergency maintenance permits) will continue.

We do see a lot of people walking, jogging and cycling on the estate. Please note that it is illegal to do that under the current lockdown rules and we should all refrain from doing that. Should you decide to walk to the Golfing Goat Halfway House Deli, please do so, but refrain from sitting in front of the Halfway House having a coffee and not adhering to the social distancing regulations.

We thank Golfing Goat for really stepping up their offering during this period and hope that the residents of Boschenmeer will continue to support them.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. We started with the second round of distribution of these funds to the intended recipients this week. We are trying to ensure that those people working at the club and is dependant of a full functional club such as the caddies, the waiters and barmen will at least have some “income” during these challenging times.

Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name. We will ensure that full transparency allows anybody insight into the eventual distribution of these funds.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

  Reminder of auction

We are celebrating Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine.

Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anville van Wyk who identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar who was a member at PGC for many years. We still need the two gentlemen on the side of Edwin so I will run with photo this week as well.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

White Backed Mousebird (Witkruis Muisvoel)
Description

The white-backed mousebird (Colius colius) is a large species of mousebird. It is distributed in western and central regions of southern Africa from Namibia and southern Botswana eastwards to Gauteng and the Eastern Cape.

This mousebird prefers scrubby dry habitats, such as thornveld, fynbos scrub and semi-desert.
This bird is about 34 cm (13.5 in) long, with the tail comprising approximately half the length, and weighs 38–64 g (1.3–2.3 oz). The upper parts, head, prominent crest and breast are grey apart from a white back stripe flanked by two broad black stripes and a dark red, or maroon, transverse band at the base of the tail. The white is not visible unless the wings are at least partly open, such as when the birds are alighting, or sometimes in hot weather. The belly is buff in colour. The bill is bluish white with a black tip, and the legs and feet are red.

The speckled mousebird can be distinguished from this species by its differently coloured beak, legs and upperparts.

Behaviour and feeding

This is a markedly social bird, with small groups of presumably related birds feeding together and engaging in mutual preening. It roosts in groups at night. Its perching habits are amusingly parrot-like; it often almost hangs from its legs rather than squatting on them like most birds, and commonly with each leg gripping a different upright branch.

The white-backed mousebird is a frugivore which subsists on fruits, berries, leaves, seeds and nectar. It also will feed on the buds of some plants, sometimes to the extent of stripping the branches of ornamentals such as fiddlewoods. Its feeding habits make it very unpopular with fruit farmers and domestic gardeners, which might be why it is very shy as a rule. When it spots a human it either sits quietly in a tree or takes off immediately. Sometimes it will settle on lawns when the grass is flowering and feed on the grass stigmata and stamens. In the wild its fruit-eating habits are an important factor in disseminating seeds of indigenous berry-producing plants such as Halleria lucida. However, it also spreads the seeds of invasive aliens such as Cotoneaster.

Breeding

These sedentary birds may breed at any time of the year when conditions are favourable. The nest is a large cup well hidden in a thicket. Nestlings are fed by both parents and also by helpers, usually young birds from previous clutches.

Golf quote of the week

Paarl Golf Club is maintained during lockdown and we are giving up greens for adoption

A big word of thanks goes out to all the individuals who give up their valuable lockdown time to make sure we have a fully functional golf course when we go out of lockdown again. Thanks also to all the residents and other members who keep on motivating the team, as well as to give their names up for any additional tasks that might be needed during this time.

Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

Thank you to all who refrain from using the golf course during this period. Not only is it illegal to do that but we also need to give the course the rest it deserves.

We have started an adopt a green concept where residents close to a specific green becomes an observer on behalf of the club, as well as to give personal attention to that specific green. I have the following people attending to the following greens and from the list it would be clear that I still need quite a number of people to attend to all 27 greens.

Green 1:
Green 2:
Green 3:
Green 4:
Green 5: Dawie and Yvette Theron
Green 6:
Green 7:
Green 8:
Green 9:
Green 10: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 11: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 12: Steph Lotz and son
Green 13: Christian van Schalkwyk
Green 14: Herman Matthee
Green 15:
Green 16:
Green 17: Jacques, Ruan and Loween Olivier
Green 18: Werner Bernhardt
Green 19: Pieter Joubert
Green 20: Johan van Zyl
Green 21: Annemie du Toit and Helaine Strydom
Green 22: George Bezuidenhout and Franz Lohbauer
Green 23: Dawie and Linki Malan
Green 24: Lana Ehlers and Family
Green 25: TBC Have a person ready.
Green 26: Anton, Alma and Jere Brits
Green 27: Anton, Alma and Jere Brits

Please let me know which green you would like to adopt and I will come and “train” you on what to do as well as to provide you with the necessary tools and material to do that. Our next adoption will be the fairways so start thinking what you would like to help with. Fairways would mostly be filling up of divots and flattening the mole heaps. Sound easy enough?

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 disaster fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lock down period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. Should the lockdown be extended we now have some funds to work with to ensure some income to those that were reliant on golfers on the course.

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anton Bezuidenhout who identified the gentleman on the left as Dan du Plessis (long standing member at Durbanville and according to Anton always dressed in jacket and tie for the prizegiving ceremony). Now we just need the man to the right of Allistair. Still unknown.

Thanks to Anville van Wyk who helped with the man on the left to be our own Peter Dryer who was a previous captain of PGC and did a lot for PGC over the years. The man on the right was Boland Golf Union President at that point in time, but we still need his name.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Again Anville van Wyk identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar, who was a member at PGC for many years. We still need the two gentlemen on the side of Edwin so I wil run with the same photo this week.

Know your birdies from your eagles

Fiery Necked Nightjar (Afrikaanse Naguil)
Description

It is at this time that the ever present and humble Fiery-necked Nightjar (Caprimulgus pectoralis) drums out its distinctive and characteristic call described by birders as “good Lord deliver us”. The call is particularly audible through the full moon phase, less so on darker nights.

Many of you will have encountered the Fiery-necked Nightjar on your evening game drives. It is the most common Nightjar, about 23cms in size, and is nocturnal by habit, feeding on insects which fly about after dark. Although this Nightjar may choose to hunt its dinner from arboreal posts, it is very often found sitting on road surfaces. They are often blinded by oncoming vehicle headlights, “sitting tight” until the very last second, before flying off in a disorientated manner. They are very well camouflaged. No wonder we unfortunately see so many of them succumb as road kills.

The Fiery-necked Nightjar was first described by Cuvier around 1816. Other common names for this bird are South African Nightjar, Pectoral Nightjar, Cuvier’s Nightjar and African Dusky Nightjar. In Afrikaans, it is called Afrikaanse naguil. Fiery-necked Nightjars have a very large range, estimated at over 4 500 000 square kilometers, and therefore exceeds the thresholds for vulnerable range sizes. Its population is considered to be stable. It occurs widely in Africa, ranging from South Africa as far north as Kenya. It enjoys the lower elevations in southern Africa and is scarce in the dry regions.

Behaviour and feeding

They are primary nocturnal birds, and is usually spotted during night time game drives. They are usually difficult to spot during day time with their camouflage type patterns which resembles bark and leaves.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is primarily a solitary bird, which is very agile in flight. This enables them to catch insects without much effort. Their large eyes enable them to hunt effectively in the dark. They can open their mouths extremely large, which enables them to catch insects much more efficient during flight.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar has as well a special middle claw (pectern) which enables them to groom themselves, and get rid of parasites and dust.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is Insectivorous and feeds primarily on: Beetles, butterflies and moths, cockroaches, termites and mantis, lacewings and antlions, grasshopper’s bee’s wasps and ants and flies.

They usually forage at dusk up until the middle of the night, or longer if the moon provides a bit of light. They like to hunt from a branch, and when catching a juicy insect then it will usually return to the same perch to feed.

Breeding

Breeding occurs during the months from August to January, the hens laying their eggs on bare ground. Both sexes take turn to incubate the eggs (18 days) and look after the chicks. The chicks are able to fly when they are about 18 to 20 days old. Fiery-necked Nightjars are monogamous and mate for life. Both sexes have almost similar plumage.

Golf quote of the week

Paarl Golf Club is maintained during lockdown

By now we are all settled down in our lockdown state. Keep it up and make South Africa a safe place again.

We have successfully trained a number of volunteers on the estate to drive the different golf course maintenance vehicles in order to keep maintaining the golf course at a high level. We would like to ensure our members and visitors that we will be ready for business come the 17th of April 2020.

A big word of thanks go out to these individuals who give up their valuable lockdown time to make sure we have a fully functional golf course when we go out of lockdown again. Thanks also to all the residents and other members who keep on motivating the team as well as to give their names up for any additional tasks that might be needed during this time. Wynand Viljoen, our greenkeeper, is running this team like a well-oiled machine and ensures that when the team starts in the morning, everything is ready for them. Thanks Wynand, your efforts are well noted and respected.

Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

Thank you to all who refrain from using the golf course during this period. Not only is it illegal to do that but we also need to give the course the rest it deserves.

Heroes off the course

A big word of thanks must also go to the Golfing Goat Halfway House Deli who really stepped up their offering during this lockdown period. Please support them in their endeavour to bring you a fully-fledged convenient store experience where you can buy anything you need to stay alive and happy during this period.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 Disaster Fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lockdown period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund, please feel free to donate to the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

Some feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R85 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. Thank you to everyone who has contributed thus far!

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anton Bezuidenhout who identified the gentleman on the left as Dan du Plessis (long standing member at Durbanville and according to Anton always dressed in jacket and tie for the prizegiving ceremony). Now we just need the man to the right of Allistair.

Adrian Moon identified the golfer below as Johan Kruger who was a brilliant amateur in the 90s and also went on to play professional golf. He is also an old Gimmie. Now we need identification of the two gentlemen on either side.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

    Speckled Mousebird (Gevlekte Muisvoel)
 
Description

This bird is about 35 cm (14 inches) long, with the tail comprising approximately half the length, and weighs about 57 grams (2 oz). It is well-named, because it is dull-mousy brown in overall colour on the back and on the head (including a prominent crest). The bill is black on the upper part and is a pinkish colour on the lower part. The rare white-headed mousebird can be confused with this species, but the differently coloured mandibles and the lack of a bare grey orbital patch render the Speckled species distinctive.

The speckled mousebird is not known for its voice, as songbirds are, although it is a noisy creature. They make a warbling tsu-tsu call while in flight, and are known for their tisk-tisk alarm call while in flight.

Behaviour and feeding

It is distributed from Cameroon east to Eritrea and Ethiopia, south through eastern Africa to southern South Africa. Most habitats are suitable for this species, except the rainforests and more arid areas. This mousebird prefers open bushveld habitats. It is widespread in savanna and open woodlands, as well as areas with tangled thickets. It is a common “backyard bird,” often seen in urban areas that contain gardens and orchards.

The speckled mousebird is a frugivore which subsists on fruits, berries, leaves, seeds and nectar, and is fairly strict in its choice of food from area to area.

These are conspicuously social birds, feeding together and engaging in mutual preening. They also accompany each other when they go to ground to dust bathe (also to occasionally to swallow pebbles to assist in grinding up vegetation as they digest it). Upon nightfall, they roost in very tight groups of 20 or so birds and on cold nights they can become torpid. Being in a torpid state could make them easy prey, but the large groups are apparently effective enough to deter most nocturnal predators.[

Breeding

These creatures may breed at any time of the year. The nest is a large (for the bird) and untidy cup made of vegetable and animal material (sometimes including cloth and paper) and is constructed by both the male and female. Clutch size ranges from one to seven eggs (apparently based on latitude), but usually averages 3–4. Nestlings are fed by both parents and also by helpers, which usually are juveniles from previous clutches. The incubation period is fourteen days and the offspring will leave the nest for the first time at about seventeen or eighteen days. After a little over a month, the nestlings will begin foraging for themselves.

Golf quote of the week

Paarl Golf Club closes down earlier

due to State of Disaster Lockdown

We were all hoping that this day would not come but due to the total lockdown as part of the Covid-19 isolation project we unfortunately also have to close down operations as a golf course. Although only planned to start lock down on Thursday 26th of March 2020 we had to start lock down earlier due to the fact that one of our golf operations personnel tested positively for the Covid-19 virus and due to protocols that need to be followed we had no other choice than to close the Golf Club with immediate effect.

We will resume operations on Friday the 17th of April 2020. Essential golf course maintenance will be done by a skeleton staff team residing on the Estate. Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

No golf will be allowed during this period and that includes practicing on the course as well as on the driving range. Should any scouts see us ignoring the lockdown they can close the golf course down and also fine the club based on the State of Disaster Act. Please members and residents on Boschenmeer estate, help us not to get into such trouble. Booking sheets will be opened for the 17th of April onwards so please use the web page or the Golfscape app to book your rounds in advance.

As an added support to our residents the Golfing Goat Halfway House Deli will remain open for business during this lockdown period. They have developed a “lockdown menu” of fantastic meals that can be delivered to the residents free of charge should the order be R50 or more. Please make use of this generous hospitality to ensure that you get the essential stuff without having to leave the estate.

Click here to read the statement from the Golfing Goat team.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 Disaster Fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lockdown period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund, please feel free to donate to the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anville van Wyk and Graham Retief who together managed to identify two of the gentlemen in the photo below.

Unknown, Alistair Brown (twice captain and president), unknown and on the right Kobus Loubser

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

    Cape Turtle Dove (Tortelduif)
 
Description

The ring-necked dove (Streptopelia capicola), also known as the Cape turtle dove or half-collared dove, is a widespread and often abundant dove species in East and southern Africa. It is a mostly sedentary bird, found in a variety of open habitats. Within range, its penetrating and rhythmic, three-syllabled crooning is a familiar sound at any time of the year. Its name is derived from the semi-collar of black feathers on the lower nape, a feature shared with a number of Streptopelia species. Like all doves they depend on surface water. They congregate in large flocks at waterholes in dry regions to drink and bathe.

Their body feathers are darkest on the upper side, where they are coloured in dull tones of grey and brown, with shades of lavender on the nape. It is paler below, where a tint of pinkish lavender is usually present. The lower belly and crissum (the undertail coverts surrounding the cloaca) is white. As with related species, they have white fringes and conspicuous white tips to the otherwise slate grey tail feathers. The tail pattern is particularly noticeable during the display flight.

Individual plumage variation is high, with some light and others almost sooty. Males and females look alike, although the males are slightly bigger. They measure 25–26.5 cm (9.8–10.4 in) in length and weigh 92–188 g (3.2–6.6 oz). The eyes are almost black, the bill is black and the feet are dark purple.

An immature is duller[10] and lacks the semi-collar of an adult. It also has buff edges to all the upper part and wing covert feathers, while the plumage below is broadly edged greyish-white.

Behaviour and feeding

It occupies a diverse range of habitat types, including semi-desert scrub, Boscia and Acacia savannah, a variety of woodland types, farmlands, open plantations and alien acacia thickets. Only closed forest or plantations, or the extensive waterless dune fields and gravel plains of the Namib are unsuited to their requirements. In southern Africa they are most commonly observed in fynbos regions, miombo and mopane woodlands, besides any grassland types from moist to dry regions. Their presence in the latter areas has been facilitated by the planting of trees in groves, for instance around farm homesteads.

They are vulnerable at exposed waterholes or in plantations where they are preyed on by lanner falcons and black sparrowhawks respectively. In addition they are preyed on by reptiles, wild cats, jackals, genets, herons, storks, eagles and barn owls. Nests are vulnerable to birds, snakes and locally, grey squirrel.

They feed mainly on seeds (of grasses, cereal grains, lupins, milkweeds, alien acacias and pines), but also on broken fruit and berries (of oaks, gums, currants and Lantana), and insects on occasion (earthworms, termites, weevils and other). Other recorded food items include small sedge bulbs, fleshy succulent leaves, aloe nectar and sugary aphid secretions

Breeding

They are monogamous, territorial nesters. Males display by flapping up a steep gradient before spiraling down with wings and tail spread out. From a perch or on the ground the male will engage in a bowing display, synchronized with a rolling crooning, “uk-carrroooo, …”, while the throat is inflated. A pair will give a double coo with a long second syllable when selecting a nest site. The female takes two to three days to construct the flimsy, platform nest. It is made of twigs and leaf petioles that are carefully selected by the male (as in other dove species), and delivered to her at the nest site. The nest is placed 2 to 10 meters above ground, on a horizontal branch fork. Quite often an old nest of another species may be used. Two to four pure white eggs are laid, and both sexes participate in the incubation that takes around two weeks. Chicks are fed regurgitated food by both parents and fledge after about 16 days.[ Several broods (up to 5) may be raised in a season.

Golf quote of the week

 

We are open!

Greeting Members and friends of PGC,

Paarl Pro Shop would like to remind everyone that we are indeed open for business! As you, our customers, are our top priority, we are taking every precautionary measure to keep you safe.

On the topic of cleaning, currently we are offering a clean out offer on AHEAD summer shorts which normally retail for R650.

Now, if you buy a pair, it will be R500, but if you buy two it will be R450 each and if you buy 3 it will be R400 each!

Look out for many more great deals and discounted packages coming your way in April.

Reserve your item >

Build your best game

When you can stand over a three- or four-foot putt knowing it’s going in, you add confidence to your whole game.
NO MORE THREE PUTTS
There are many small tweaks that can help to calm the stroke. When you’re on the practice green, your main focus should be developing a rhythmic, pendulum motion that’s easy to repeat.
How important is playing better golf to you?
Please let us know >

Find your truth

The lie that makes a good swing better
Hitting the green from over 120 metres out with solid iron contact is a great feeling. And you could experience it more regularly when your lie angle is correct. It’s also going to make it easier to control where you land on the green.
A stubborn slice could be caused by a lie angle that is too flat for you, rather than a swing issue. By correcting this, you can avoid unnecessary swing adjustments while hitting it straighter and more consistently.
Many brands try and solve the problems they think each golfer might have at different handicap levels by creating off-the-shelf irons with a specific lie angle. But that might not be right for you.

Paarl Golf Club remains active during Corona ban

By now everybody is familiar with the State of Emergency declared by our President on Sunday 15 March 2020. As could be expected, Monday was as mad as can be, but we eventually got to grips with the consequences of the declaration.

Due to the declaration, we at Paarl Golf Club (in support with the Western Cape Golf Course Managers Association), had to determine how we are going to remain active, and also show our full support to the requests from the President. Unfortunately we had to stop the Ladies Open planned for Thursday, as well as the Winelands Senior tournament scheduled for Thursday and Friday. This was mainly done based on the fact that we might end up with more than 100 people in a confined space during the prize giving ceremony.

We also had to bring in some “local rules” to ensure the minimum chance of contamination should we keep the course open for play. Luckily golf is one of the few activities where close and direct contact with your fellow players is not necessary. We therefore concentrated on possible areas where more than one person could touch.

You will see that we are leaving our doors to the change rooms open and there are waterless hand sanitation and paper towels provided in the change rooms. We are also promoting cashless transactions where each person can handle his own card for payment. Thirdly we removed all bunker rakes and “declared” a local rule where should you land up in a bunker in an unraked area, you may place the ball in the bunker to the closest raked area not nearer to the hole. The bunkers will be mechanically raked every morning for the period till the declaration is withdrawn.

Lastly, we also removed the igloos with cold water on the 6th, 14th and 23rd holes. Ice will be provided by the starter and we urge golfers to please bring their own canister to hold water and ice. We further suggest that handling of the flagpole be limited to a minimum. Caddies were also informed not to “clean” clubs before and after rounds and when they caddy, they would leave the bag for the golfer to choose his club. After the golfer has replaced the club in the bag, the caddie will then only pick up the bag and move with the golfer.

We sincerely hope that all golfers will still enjoy the hospitality of Paarl Golf Club and that we together come through this declared disaster period without harm.

Bottomline is to enjoy every moment out there.

Lift, clean and drop on fairways stopped

We had many golfers questioning our decision to allow lift, clean and drop on our fairways. Firstly, the feeling was that overall our fairways are in a very good condition and secondly, the practice of lift, clean and drop is not fully supported by the golfing administration world.

We therefore have decided to mark all the areas where the fairways are not conducive to play as it lies so that golfers would know when to drop at the nearest point of relief on the fairway and not nearer to the hole. We believe this will move us closer to the fundamental rule of golf and that is to play the ball as it lies. We thank all our members that supported the trial run, but also know that our members will support this new way of dealing with bad patches on our fairways.

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anville van Wyk and Graham Retief who together managed to identify quite a number of the gentlemen in both of these photos.

FLTR: Unknown, Wynand (Nassie) Mans (Springbok wing in the 60s and 70s), Gerrie Brandt (committee member for years and regular sponsor through his business, Kilotreads, also identified by his son Giepie Brandt), Steven de Beer (still one of the corner boys) and Izak Britz (committee member for many years).

FLTR: Andy van Wyk (previous Captain & President), Ben van Zyl, Len Horne, Henri Dickson, unknown, Frans Slabber and Arnek Smidt (WP wing during the 60s)

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Rulesflash

When to re-drop your ball

There seem to be confusion amongst players when they should “re-drop” a ball after dropping a ball to take relief (penalty or free drop).

When to drop again:
1. If the player drops a ball the wrong way.

The right way is:

a. Dropped only by player
b. Straight down from knee height, falling straight down without the player throwing, spinning or rolling it or using any other motion that might affect where the ball will come to rest.
c. The ball does not touch any part of the player’s body or equipment before it hits the ground.
d. Drop a ball in the relief area. When it’s a penalty drop, the relief area is two club lengths, whilst a free drop one club length from nearest point of relief.

If a ball is dropped in the wrong way the player must drop a ball the right way. There is no limit to the number of times the player must do so.

If a player does not drop again and instead makes a stroke at the ball dropped in the wrong way, and the ball is played from the relief area the player gets a one stroke penalty. If the ball is played from outside the relief area or it was placed when required to be dropped (no matter where it’s played from), the player gets the general penalty (two strokes).

2. When the ball is dropped in the right way and then comes to rest outside the relief area the ball must be dropped in the right way for a second time. If the ball comes to rest outside the relief area after the second drop, the player must place a ball on the spot where the ball dropped for the second time first touched the ground.

Remember that if the ball is dropped in the right way and comes to rest in the relief area, the player has completed taking relief and must play the ball as it lies even if his stance is in a penalty area (water). This must not be confused when taking relief from Abnormal Course Conditions where a player must take complete relief (not touching the area from which relief is taken).

If you have any questions, please contact me at paarlmrrules@gmail.com

Enjoy your golf,
Mr R

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

     Red-Eyed Dove (Groot Ringnekduif)
 
Description

The red-eyed dove is a largish, stocky pigeon, typically 30 cm (12 inches) in length. Its back, wings and tail are pale brown. When flying, it shows blackish flight feathers. The head and underparts are dark vinous-pink, shading to pale grey on the face. There is a black hind neck patch edged with white. The legs and a patch of bare skin around the eye are red. The call is a loud doo-doo-du-du.

Sexes are similar, but juveniles are duller than adults, and have scalloping on the body feathers.

Behaviour and feeding

It is distributed through most of sub-Saharan Africa except in desert zones. It is a common, if not abundant, species in most habitats other than desert. Like several other species in this genus, they are not particularly gregarious and often feed alone or in pairs. They can be found in forests near rivers.

Red-eyed doves eat grass seeds, grains and other vegetation. They often forage on the ground.

Breeding

Females lay two white eggs at a time. This species builds a stick nest in a tree and lays two white eggs. Its flight is quick, with the regular beats and an occasional sharp flick of the wings which are characteristic of pigeons in general.

Golf quote of the week

Renovation of dining facilities

Those members that did not attend the AGM might not be familiar with the fact that the Board of PGC has approved the planned renovations of the bar-restaurant and veranda area.

The idea is to combine the bar, the restaurant and the veranda in front of the bar under one roof space. The captain Jacques Olivier has been the driving force behind this idea and got the ball rolling with some conceptual ideas and input from a few experts. We would like to thank him for this initiative and hope that we will be able to get construction going when we start the April hollowtining process.

Below is an architect’s vision of the look and feel of this area:

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.

Lift, clean and drop on fairways

Just to confirm to all members (and visitors) that due to the heat and minimum rain we are experiencing, there are some areas on the fairways that might not be conducive to the rule “play it as it lies.”

We therefore have made a local rule that when you do land up in such an area on the fairway you may lift, clean and drop the ball within one club length not nearer to the hole.

We sincerely hope that this would ease the pressure there is on the greenkeeping staff to maintain perfect fairways under trying conditions. These areas also don’t have to be marked anymore because the decision lies with the golfer if their lie is, or is not acceptable.

Droogtehulp financial feedback

Members would recall that we held a Droogte Hulp Golf Day on the 31st of January 2020. Paarl Golf Club offered the course for free to the organisers and Golfing Goat also pitched in with supplying the food for the day on their account.

We anticipated to get R250 000 in for the day but the final figures came as a big surprise totalling at R315 000. This amount was made up as follows:

Income from 4 ball teams: R116 250.00
Raffle: R3 950.00
Mulligans: R8 850.00
Putting: R500.00
Main Auction: R139 500.00
Quiet Auction: R45 951.00
Total: R315 001.00
Thanks to everybody that contributed to make this day a success. A big word of thanks also came from the Britstown Farmers who benefitted from this day.

New board members and portfolios

During the Annual General Meeting we bid farewell to a few board members and welcomed two new ones. Three board members reached the end of their term, namely Leon Cronje, Andre Moller and Amanda Williams. We thank them for their efforts during their term. A special word of thanks to Leon who kept the finances healthy and transparent.

We also had to say goodbye to our President, Christie Viviers, who always were there to help when it was needed. A new President in Joep Joubert was elected and we look forward to seeing what Joep is going to leave as his presidential legacy.

We also welcome two new board members in Ganief Daniels and Kobus Sieberhagen. At the first board meeting we also placed these board members in the new structure of the board. A few portfolios were created that coincide with the different sections within the PGC.

The following portfolios were created:

• Chairman Christian van Schalkwyk
• Managing Director Willem Pretorius
• Finance and Business Development Carel Goosen
• Golf Operations and Marketing Kobus Sieberhagen
• Captains’ and Course Committees Jacques Olivier
• Ladies and Fundraising Helaine Strydom
• Water Affairs and HOA Liaison Des O Reilly (Vice Chairman)
combined with Infrastructure together with Ganief Daniels
and Ancillary Revenue

New kid on the block

We welcome Maria Kirton to the PGC team!

Maria was appointed in the position of Golf Experience Coordinator who will be responsible for various facets of the golfing experience at PGC with her immediate challenge to optimise the registration desk at PGC. She will also be involved with the coordination of the group bookings from a golfing experience point of view as well as the new members interaction with the club and how they experience PGC as a new member.

We look forward to what Maria’s energy and passion for the game of golf would bring to PGC.

New face in registration

Members might have noticed that there is another new face at registration desk.

Tiaan van Niekerk was appointed on a temporary basis to help at registration during the peak season. He is also evaluating the interaction between the financial system, Jonas, and the tee time booking system, Golfscape, that is used by registration. He will help out till the end of the peak season that comes to an end before we hollowtine our greens from 19 April 2020.

Welcome, Tiaan!

We want you!

Marketing and Public Relations Officer

Click to enlarge

Many moons ago

The photograph of last week bowled everybody out. I had no feedback on any of these gentlemen pictured below. Maybe it was just missed so I sincerely hope that somebody out there might recognise some of them.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

Speckeled Pigeon (Kransduif)
Description

The speckled pigeon (Columba guinea), or (African) rock pigeon, is a pigeon that is a resident breeding bird in much of Africa south of the Sahara. It is a common and widespread species in open habitats over much of its range, although there are sizable gaps in its distribution. It is sometimes referred to as a Guinea Pigeon due to its similar colouring to some species of guineafowl.

This is a large pigeon at 41 cm in length. Its back and wings are rufous, the latter heavily speckled with white spots. The rest of the upperparts and underparts are blue-grey, and the head is grey with red patches around the eye. The neck is brownish, streaked with white, and the legs are red. The call is a loud doo-doo-doo.

Behaviour and feeding

Its flight is quick, with regular beats and an occasional sharp flick of the wings that are characteristic of pigeons in general.

The speckled pigeon is frequently seen around human habitation and cultivation. Most of its food is vegetable, and it gathers in large numbers where grain or groundnuts are available.

Breeding

This species builds a large stick nest on protected rocky outcrops and in urban areas often atop covered pergola pillars and on flat roofs under deep eaves and lays two white eggs.

Golf quote of the week

PGC Annual General Meeting

We would like to thank all the members that attended the PGC Annual General Meeting on Wednesday the 26th of February 2020. It turned out to be a very informative and positive meeting ending in a friendly cheese and wine function sponsored by our own Golfing Goat team.

A special thanks must go out to the members who supported our plan of being more aggressive to the moss problem. You will see the Servest teams already in action with testing sections on one of the practice greens. We will keep the members informed on the progress with our plan.

As a follow up on one of our vision points to average 53 200 rounds per annum, we can report that our February 2020 rounds total of 6 634 rounds are the second highest ever. Compared to the 5 year average of 6 397 for February month, this confirms that we are starting to get the amount of golfers through that we need. Well done to everybody that formed part of this phenomenal month!

Friday fire

We had quite a scare last Friday when the mountain fire almost got out of hand, ending very close to the Boschenmeer Estate Gate 2.

Luckily the wind died down and the fire could be extinguished the next day. Although very scary, it made for quite interesting photographs and a number of photographers from the Estate gathered to capture this event.


View from the 25th fairway towards the mountain

View from the Estate towards the fire at the back of some of the houses
Montagu Island Challenge

It is almost time again for the monthly Montagu Island Challenge! Our members have the chance to win a delicious hamper from Montagu fruits if they manage to hit the island in the clubhouse dam more regularly than the other competitors.

This happens every Meat Wednesday after the game where the members get the chance to “buy” 4 golf balls for R20 and then proceed to hit them towards the island from the veranda. The winner is determined through a process of elimination and this has become quite a favourite amongst the members.

Last month’s winner was our own captain, Jacques Olivier, who managed to hit all 4 balls on the island and then proceeded to beat Jannie van Breda in the playoff to secure his Montagu hamper.

Employee of the Month

As part of our commitment to give everybody visiting Paarl Golf Club a memorable experience, we try to motivate all the personnel through an employee of the month award! This is based on something special and extraordinary done by that specific individual who then gets nominated for this accolade. For the month of February 2020 we had three nominations for special performances.

Congratulations to Junaid Ahmed, Anwar Sias and Jaco Botha for their outstanding efforts during February 2020.

We want you!

Marketing and Public Relations Officer

Click to enlarge

Apply now >

Many moons ago

Thanks to a number of members who helped us out with the names of these five gentlemen. Franz Lohbauer was quickest out of the blocks identifying his Kruger team mates from the 80s.


They are FLTR: Dicky Kock, Gavin Brown, Gerrit Visser, Franz Lohbauer and Jimmy Bredenkamp.
Dan Frater also helped with Dicky Kock, identifying him as the son of Uli Kock, while Leslie Watson also helped with three of the names.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Rulesflash

Tee it forward
I’ve noticed numerous players playing from the white tees and struggling to reach some of the fairways which then also affects their pace-of-play.

Taken from this week’s Golf Chat by Dale Hayes:

Jack Nicklaus, Golf’s Greatest Golfer, has been quoted as saying; “I don’t hit the ball as far as I used to, which is why I don’t tee off the back tees anymore!

Well if Jack Nicklaus doesn’t, why should we. 85% of golfers who tried the forward tees, said they had more fun.

Here’s a simple guide to help you decide which tees you should be using:

Driver in Metres Course in Metres
180 5000: Red tees
220 5500: Blue tees
240    6000: White tees
Enjoy your golf,
Mr R

If you have any questions, please contact me at paarlmrrules@gmail.com

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

 Water Thick-Knee (Water Dikkop)
 
Description

The water thick-knee (Burhinus vermiculatus), or water dikkop, is a species of bird in the thick-knee family Burhinidae. The species is found across sub-Saharan Africa, usually close to water.

The water thick-knee is 38 to 41 cm (15–16 in) and weighs 293–320 g (10.3–11.3 oz). It has a heavy bill that is black with yellow at the base. The wings are broad and blunt and the tail is short.

Behaviour and feeding

The water thick-knee is a terrestrial feeder that forages at night. Although it is typically associated with water it can be found foraging up to 1 km from water. It feeds on insects, crustaceans and mollusks.

Breeding

The water thick-knee generally breeds in the dry season or early rainy season. It is a monogamous breeder. The nest is a simple scrape in sandy or stony ground, usually close to water. The clutch size is two sandy-yellow eggs. Both sexes incubate the eggs for 22-25 days, and both are responsible for feeding the young.

Golf quote of the week

 

Reminder of the PGC Annual General Meeting

We would like to remind members that the PGC Annual General Meeting will be held on Wednesday the 26th of February 2020 at 18:30 in the Winelands Hall.

We would like to invite members to please attend this important meeting and should you like to nominate anybody for some position on the Board or the Captains Committee, please note that you need to hand in a completed nomination form  at the PGC Administration office by 12:00 on the 20th of February 2020.

We look forward to sharing some interesting opportunities coming your way in 2020.

Vandalism remains a reality on the estate

Members might have seen, especially when playing early mornings that infrastructure on the golf course does suffer vandalism from time to time.

A concerted effort between PGC and BMHOA is currently taking place to try and curb the constant vandalism taking place. These incidents are happening more frequently when the school holidays are in place. There are also certain “hot spots” that will be under surveillance more often to try and catch these vandals red-handed. Please help us in identifying these culprits in order for us to deal with them in the proper manner. Below just an example of what they are up to.


Photo above of scene early morning on the 21st Tee box where the dustbin was rolled over and vandalised. The half barrel keeping the divot sand was emptied and cracked.

Rulesflash

Rules regarding starting times

Lately there is an increase of players arriving late at the teeing area and therefore starting their round late. Here is what the rules of golf have to say about starting your round: Rule 5.3a is applicable.

A player’s round starts when the player makes a stroke to start his or her first hole.

The player must start at (and not before) his or her starting time:

• This means that the player must be ready to play at the starting time and starting point set by the Committee.
• A starting time set by the Committee is treated as an exact time (for example, 9am means 9:00:00 am, not any time until 9:01am)

If the starting time is delayed for any reason (such as weather, slow play of other groups or the need for a ruling by a referee), there is no breach of this Rule if the player is present and ready to play when the player’s group is able to start.

Penalty for Breach of Rule 5.3a
Disqualification, except in these three cases:

• Exception 1 – Player arrives at starting point, ready to play, no more than five (5) minutes late: The player gets the general penalty (2 shot) applied to his or her first hole.

• Exception 2 – Player starts no more than five (5) minutes early: The player gets the general penalty (2 shot) applied to his or her first hole.

• Exception 3 – Committee decides that exceptional circumstances prevented player from starting on time: There is no breach of this rule and no penalty.

The interpretations of golf clearly state that examples of circumstances that would not generally be considered exceptional include:
• The player gets lost or his or her car breaks down on the way to the course.
• Heavy traffic or an accident results in the journey to the course taking longer than expected.

Hopefully this will make players aware that they should be ready to play when it is their starting time.

If you have any questions, please contact me at paarlmrrules@gmail.com

Many moons ago

Thank you so much for the email received to identifying the gentleman in the photo.  His name is Johnny Pauw, the man behind the Boschenmeer Golf Estate development. Thank you, Jan Hanekom for being the first member to identify of the gentlemen in the photo.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph is. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

African Jacana (Groot Langtoon)
Description

African Jacanas are conspicuous and unmistakable birds. They are about 30 cm long, but females are larger than males. They have chestnut upperparts with black wingtips, rear neck, and eyestripe. The underparts are also chestnut in the adults, only in juveniles they are white with a chestnut belly patch. The blue bill extends up as a coot-like head shield, and the legs and long toes are grey.

Food and feeding

African Jacanas feed on insects and other invertebrates picked from the floating vegetation or the surface of the water.

Breeding

African Jacanas breed throughout sub-Saharan Africa. It is sedentary apart from seasonal dispersion. It lays four black-marked brown eggs in a floating nest.

The Jacana has evolved a highly unusually polyandrous mating system, meaning that one female mates with multiple males and the male alone cares for the chicks. Such a system has evolved due to a combination of two factors: firstly, the lakes that the jacana lives on are so resource-rich that the relative energy expended by the female in producing each egg is effectively negligible. Secondly the jacana, as a bird, lays eggs and eggs can be equally well incubated and cared for by a parent bird of either gender. This means that the rate-limiting factor of the jacana’s breeding is the rate at which the males can raise and care for the chicks

The parent that forms part of the harem is almost always the one that ends up caring for the offspring; in this case, each male jacana incubates and rears a nest of chicks. The male African Jacana has therefore evolved some remarkable adaptations for parental care, such as the ability to pick up and carry chicks underneath its wings.

Golf quote of the week

CMASA Club Of The Year Competition

The Club Management Association of Southern Africa (CMASA) invited all clubs in South Africa at the end of 2019 to enter into the Club of the Year competition. Paarl Golf Club entered through a big administrative effort from specifically Heidi Strydom, our Financial Manager.

Only thirteen clubs in South Africa made it through to the final assessment for the honour of becoming the Club of the Year.

We did not win Club Of The Year but received a plaque for distinction on the following categories:

• Benchmarking and Finance
• Education & Training
• Communication & Participation
• Members survey & Guest Experience

From Left to Right: Werner Bernhardt, Willem Pretorius, Heidi Strydom and Wynand Viljoen
Members should note that this is not just for Golf clubs but all sporting clubs in the country. It is also good to know that only two clubs from the Western Cape went through to the final assessment. We congratulate our “neighbour” Stellenbosch Golf Club for also making that last hurdle. The winning club was Umhlali Country Club in Natal. Thanks to all our members who responded so well through the members survey and my personnel for keeping the standard of Club Management at this high level in Paarl.

Many moons ago

Thank you so much for the email received to identifying the gentleman in the photo. His name is Johan Redelinghuys. Thank you, Jan Hanekom for the identification of the gentlemen in the photo.

Errata! Sorry for the wrong identification of Piet van der Merwe in the photo below as Hennie Liebenberg. We sincerely apologise for this error and hope that we will be able to avoid something like that in the future
Piet van der Merwe on the right
I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentleman on the photograph is. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

BMW Golf Cup International 2019 National Final

Well done to our own Jannie van Breda for winning the BMW Golf Cup South African Finals at Sun City. He will now represent South Africa at the World Finals to be held at Fancourt later this year. We wish him all the best and may you bring the title home!
Jannie at the prizegiving ceremony with his winning smile
Poetry in motion!

In conversation with our Members

Do you want to see your picture on the wall?

Please hand in this form at registration or admin if you want to be featured in our next newsletter.

Email your photo to administration@paarlgc.co.za or we can take a photo.

Rulesflash
There seem to be confusion around playing a provisional ball. Rule 18.3 is applicable.

If a ball might be lost outside a penalty area or be out of bounds to save time the player may play another ball provisionally, under penalty of stroke and distance.

Announcing Play of Provincial Ball

Before the stroke is made, the player must announce that he or she is going to play a provisional ball:

It is not enough for the player only to say that he or she is playing another ball or is playing again.

The player must use the word “provisional” or otherwise clearly indicate that he or she is playing the ball provisionally.

If we have a look in the official interpretations of the rules, the rule states that the announcement should be clear so that everybody can hear the announcement.

Examples of announcements that clearly indicate that the player is playing a provisional ball include:

“I’m playing a ball under Rule 18.3”
“I’m going to play another just incase”

Examples of announcements that do not clearly indicate the player is playing a provisional ball, it means that a player would be putting a ball into play under stroke and distance include:

“I’m going to re-load”
“I’m going to play another”

Playing provisional ball until it becomes the ball in play or is abandoned.

Playing Provisional Ball More Than Once

The player may continue to play the provisional ball without losing its status as a provisional ball so long as it is played from a spot that is the same distance or farther from the the hole than where the original ball is estimated to be. See diagram below.

When a provisional ball is played from spot nearer the hole than where the original ball is estimated to be the original ball is no longer in play (even if it is then found on the course before the end of the three-minute search time or is found nearer the hole than had been estimated) and is now a wrong ball that must not be played.

If the player plays a provisional ball into the same general location as the original ball and is unable to identify which ball is which:

If only one of the balls is found on the course, that ball is treated as the provisional ball which is now in play.

If both balls are found on the course, the player must choose one of the balls to be treated as the provisional ball which is now in play, and the other ball is treated as lost and must not be played.

Know your birdies from your eagles

Common Moorhen (Groot waterhoender)
Description
The moorhen is a distinctive species, with dark plumage apart from the white undertail, yellow legs and a red frontal shield. The young are browner and lack the red shield. The frontal shield of the adult has a rounded top and fairly parallel sides; the tailward margin of the red unfeathered area is a smooth waving line.

Behaviour
This species will consume a wide variety of vegetable material and small aquatic creatures. They forage beside or in the water, sometimes walking on lily pads or upending in the water to feed. They are often secretive but can become tame in some areas. Despite loss of habitat in parts of its range, the common moorhen remains plentiful and widespread.

Habitat
This is a common breeding bird in marsh environments, well-vegetated lakes and even in city parks and built up areas.

Golf quote of the week